The Life Athletics

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This week we have been challenged to write about ‘athleticism’.

‘Some people consider themselves athletes, others do not’.

I don’t consider myself to be an athlete, athletics involves running round in endless circles trying to impress the PE teacher’s stopwatch or throwing dangerous objects with precision.  No, athletics was never for me.  I don’t do speed or accuracy, especially not in a physical context.

What is this ‘athleticism’?  Is it a description of an athlete’s prowess?  The silhouetted sylph like ballerina, with every tensed muscle honed and toned,  in a delicate pose of balance, the perfect fruition of focused and almost obsessive dedication?  If that’s the case then athleticism doesn’t appeal to me, it’s something unattainable.  I have the grace of a lead weight spinning top.  This athleticism implies focus, discipline, talent and labour but with a hint of idealisation.   Can anyone really attain to this ideal or do you have to be one of those shiny, perfect, cool girls who find PE lessons easy, like everything else in their life?

Source: weheartit.com via Jenny on Pinterest

But maybe we’ve got the wrong idea.  We live in a culture obsessed with perfection, half the time we don’t even know what it is we’re seeking or trying to live up to.  It’s a vague, ephemeral challenge that you either meet just like that or spend a lifetime trying to chase.  Then I found this definition on one of those internet dictionaries:

Athleticism is the quality of being coordinated and physically strong while also having stamina and coordination.

I like this athleticism!  Athleticism is attainable; it’s no longer the exclusive preserve for other people.  It’s about reaching the peak of your own abilities, reaching out and succeeding according to a personal standard of achievement.  Perfection is being true to yourself rather than some media fantasy which as yet remains undefined.

Everyone can be athletes, it’s a lifestyle. Life demands stamina and coordination, life is a marathon juggling act.  We can all be coordinated (within whatever limitations random flukes of genetics have imposed upon us) and physically strong (again within those limitations that we have no control over whatsoever).

I am heartened.  We can all achieve, we can participate without having to compete.  We can enjoy participation without focusing on perfection.  Let’s accept each other for who we are.  Life is definitely not a sprint and there’s plenty of hurdles along the way too.  We’re going to have to be athletes to make it to the end.

Write On Edge: Red-Writing-Hood

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 Source: bing.com via Celina on Pinterest
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9 thoughts on “The Life Athletics

  1. weathervane

    I’m really enjoying the design and layout of your blog. It’s a very easy on the eyes which makes it much more pleasant for me to come here and visit more often. Did you hire out a developer to create your theme? Excellent work!

  2. Very good! I loved they way you described your grace as a “lead weight spinning top”. I can totally visualize and relate to that. I tripped UP the stairs this past week and sprained my toe. LOL So I totally understand feeling that way!

  3. “I am heartened. We can all achieve, we can participate without having to compete. We can enjoy participation without focusing on perfection.” I wish this was taught in schools! That attitude is what I need to have and cannot seem to bring myself around to. I WANT athleticism to be about not-competing, and yet everywhere I turn, I am returned to the gym teacher who made the losing team run laps. I like your thoughts! And thanks for commenting on my blog!

    • We’ve lost sight of something important, especially in children’s sports. It should be about having fun not the competition, winning is not the only success. Thanks for stopping by. :)

  4. “life is a marathon juggling act.”

    Yes, it totally is! I love where you went with this-so positive and uplifting. Thanks so much for sharing!

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